This website uses cookies to function correctly.
You may delete cookies at any time but doing so may result in some parts of the site not working correctly.
 

Noticeboard

GP & Nurse Surgeries Monday to Friday 6.30pm - 8pm and Saturday mornings.  See 'Clinics & Services'

 

consultGet the Most Out of Your Consultation

Updated on 19th June 2012 at 12:31 pm

 In Great Britain, patients on average have just seven minutes with their GP. The BMA’s Doctor Patient Partnership offers the following advice to help you use this time effectively:

Be Prepared:

  • Make a list of any questions / problems you wish to discuss before hand.
  • Take a pen & paper as you may want to note down important points.
  • Wear loose clothing if it’s likely you will need to be examined.
  • Be prepared to tell your doctor of any non-prescription medicines or supplements you are taking.
  • You can bring someone with you for support.

During The Appointment:

Don’t be afraid to ask questions.

If you don’t understand, ask your doctor to repeat it or write it down.

If you are prescribed a drug, make sure you know why it has been given to you, how long to take it for etc. Remember pharmacists are experts in medication and a very useful source of advice.

Be direct. If you have a problem that you find embarrassing or difficult to talk about, don’t leave it to the end of the appointment before mentioning it. Remember your problem is likely to a common one for your GP, who is there to help you.

One problem at a time:

If you have several problems it is more effective in the long run to concentrate on just one problem during the consultation than to have to rush through a list of problems. Be prepared to make another appointment so that each problem can be given the time it needs to be sorted out.

Be on Time:

Be on time for your appointment, or inform the surgery as soon as possible  if you wish to cancel your appointment.

Separate Appointments:

Make a separate appointment for each member of the family.

Under 14 Year Olds:

Accompany under 14 year olds. If however, a young person strongly wishes to be treated without his/her parent’s involvement, his/her confidentiality will be respected.

 
Call 111 when you need medical help fast but it’s not a 999 emergencyNHS ChoicesThis site is brought to you by My Surgery Website